Blog

What Is Your PII? Protect Your Personal Information Today!

Share on facebook
Facebook
Share on twitter
Twitter
Share on linkedin
LinkedIn

What is PII?

Whether at work, at home, or on the go, we’re beholden to a lifecycle of data that is often the top target of cybercriminals. 

Protecting that data isn’t a highly technical process, but rather one that requires common t to privacy in every aspect of our lives! sense and a strong commitment  

PII, or personally identifiable information, is sensitive data that could be used to identify, contact, or locate an individual. t to privacy in every aspect our live

What are some examples of PII?

PII includes (but is not limited to) home addresses, personal email addresses, national ID numbers, credit card numbers, and personal phone numbers. 

What are some examples of non-PII? Info such as business phone numbers and email addresses, race, religion, gender, workplace, and job titles are typically not considered PII. 

But they should still be treated as sensitive, linkable info because they could identify an individual when combined with other data.

protecting your personal information is incredible important for nyc based accountants

Why is PII so important? On a personal level, our PII is necessary to acquire some goods and services, such as medical care and utilities. But in the wrong hands, PII leads to identity theft and other forms of fraud. 

On a professional level, we may store PII of customers, clients, vendors, contractors, employees, and partners. If left unprotected, our organization could face steep fines and our reputation could be severely damaged. How do you protect PII at work? 

Protecting PII begins and ends with following our organization’s security policies, which were created to ensure that the data we handle remains private. 

Treat all requests for sensitive info with a high degree of scrutiny, stay alert, think before you click, and if you have any questions, please ask! For more info on email filtering click here

protecting your personal information is the key to running a successful nyc based accounting firm

How do you protect PII at home?

We encourage you to develop a home security policy similar to what we use here at work, which calls for common sense practices, such as not clicking on random links and attachments, guarding personal info online and in real life, destroying sensitive documents beyond recognition, and setting social media profiles to fully private.

Living in a society that’s so immersed in connectivity and technology has, unfortunately,
led to a sacrifice of privacy. Certain smartphone apps, for example, can’t function without
access to our contacts and location. 

If you need medical care, you must entrust your highly sensitive info to an entity that you know is a common target for cybercriminals. 

And every smart gadget you activate in your personal life collects, stores, and transfers your data in exchange for a bit of convenience. 

But at what cost?


Our data is like currency, and it has value for both legit and illegal purposes. Preventing the latter should remain our top goal. How do we accomplish that goal? By using the best defense we have: common sense. 

Scammers and social engineers violate privacy by gaining your trust and convincing you to release info or to click on something or to install

How Accounting Firms Can Avoid Identity Theft

Reduce Information

Limit the amount of personal info you make public. Set your social media profiles to fully private and thoroughly vet all friend requests.

Remain Skeptical

Limit the amount of personal info you make public. Set your social media profiles to fully private and thoroughly vet all friend requests.

Respond Responsibly

Limit the amount of personal info you make public. Set your social media profiles to fully private and thoroughly vet all friend requests.

Record Activity

Log into your financial accounts weekly to confirm that no unauthorized purchases have been made and consider placing fraud alerts on your credit reports.

Restore Defaults

Log into your financial accounts weekly to confirm that no unauthorized purchases have been made and consider placing fraud alerts on your credit reports.

If Your Accounting Firm Has Been Comprised

Perhaps no email is worse than the one that begins with something like “Dear customer, we regret to notify you of a data security incident that may have exposed some of your personal information…” 

Regardless of how the incident occurred, your next actions are an imperative part of recovery. Here’s a quick, step-by-step guide for what to do if your data is part of a breach. Update your passwords. Hopefully, you already use unique codes for each account, but a breach serves as a good time to update your passwords.

Alert financial institutions and credit bureaus. By reporting the incident to the relevant institutions, you can mitigate future damages and prevent cybercriminals from making fraudulent charges or stealing your identity.

Place fraud alerts on your credit reports. In some cases, the compromised entity may offer free credit monitoring, which alerts you to any changes on your credit (such as a newly opened account). You can even take this a step further by freezing your reports, which prevents all credit checks until the freeze is lifted.

Keep a close eye on your banking accounts. It’s important to routinely check for unauthorized transactions in general, but it is essential to do so after a data breach.

Stay alert for additional phishing attacks. Cyber thieves use stolen account credentials to launch phishing campaigns and other attempts to scam data breach victims.

16 Questions To Ask Before Hiring An IT Company

If You Depend On Your Computer Network To Run Your Business, This Is One Report You DON’T Want To Overlook!